Review: Phylum Child - In the Sawdust Lobby (Koppklys, 2012)

The laid-back and disarmingly simple sounds of the East Coast rock unit Phylum Child appear to echo the prose of late Jack Kerouac, when he was already getting tired of all the Beatnik-star-in-the-center-of-attention lifestyle with all the wild parties and bullshit chit-chats with worshipping Beatniks and other artsy types. The music of Phylum Child is seemingly the rebellion against all the “experimental”, “challenging” horseshit surrounding them and the retreat into the basic, sun-drenched shelter of pop chanelling the times, when the electric guitar was the symbol of popular music.

Following the blurb on the Koppklys website, Phylum Child lies somewhere between 90’s sunny indie pop and delicate shoegaze (not the “drowning in distortion” kind, maybe with the exception of wonderfully smeared “Telewisher”, which sounds like an outtake from Belong’s Common Era). The carefree atmosphere might call for chillwave comparisons, albeit the six string honesty and simplicity brings closer the modern “chill indie” units like Real Estate to mind rather than the likes of Toro y Moi. The jangling guitars are occasionally adorned with oldschool, somewhat kitschy beats. The band’s style is purposefully, as one of the song names suggest, “Out of Style”.

It’s a nice, refreshing little tape in the scene, where the format is dominated by lengthy drones, screeching electronics and wild psychedelic jams. It’s a little island of simplicity on the sea of neo-psych madness.

Only 3 copies left from Koppklys!